Peal

Randall Couch

2017

Syntax is to word order as melody is to note order. Peal explores the analogy of melody and syntax by applying the methods of bell change ringing to rows of words: poetic lines. Each individual poem begins with a line of four to nine nonrepeating words. That line is then permuted according to one of the methods, resulting in anywhere from 12 to 240 unique variations. By convention, the word corresponding to the heaviest working bell is coloured blue (the “blue line”) and the word corresponding to the treble or highest-pitched bell is coloured red. The starting lines—all quotations—form the cento that opens the book, where their inflections evoke thematic relationships. Their permutations create distinctive visual patterns as well as frequent semantic surprises. The methods have been chosen with an eye to the associations created by juxtaposing their names with the corresponding starting lines. 144pp 235 x 170mm, casebound with headbands, printed three-colour offset. Typography by Colin Sackett, and perhaps one of the most elaborate of Coracle productions. 300 copies

€40.00 P

Four Trees

Joan Roth

2017

Sampler of the work of the photographer Joan Roth. Two whole plate images interleaved with japanese tissue, a frontispiece, and a cover image set into the cover of the book. They are taken from a handful of originals made in the late nineteen nineties and early two thousands, most usually of the trees in the gardens of her house in Hymenstown, New Inn in County Tipperary, Ireland, but bhere the two centrefolds are of eucalyptus trees in Elk, California. The images are first printed as silver nitrate gelatin prints on mould-made or hand-made paper, exposed lightly in the darkroom from the negative. More detail and darkness is then added by graphite pencil. 100 numbered copies, printed digitally, casebound, 310 x 225mm, with embossed cover image.

€25.00 Ph

Cork City

Peter Downsbrough

2017

Printed photographs made on the visit to Cork in 2011, to particpate in the 'In Other Words' exhibition at the Glucksman Gallery.This casebound book contains two maps of the city, and an embossed contact strip of the photographs set into the cover. The images convey the parallels and verticals of his photographs set in the sequence of book form, his usual medium. 60pp offset 155 x 230mm. 300 copies155 x 230

€30.00 AB

Selected Postcards 2017

Coracle

2017

50+ postcards 1978-2017. an Assortment of Coracle postcards by Erica Van Horn, Simon Cutts, John Bevis, Les Coleman, Tony Cragg, Bill Culbert, Chris Drury, Stephen Duncalf, Harry Gilonis, Antony Gormley, Percy Grainger, Bernard Lassus, Richard Long, Paul Lincoln, Kay Roberts, Colin Sackett, Patrick Saytour, Yoko Terauchi, printed by letterpress, four-colour offset and digitally, even handpainted, on millboard and card of various weights in green paper covered box 130 x 180 x 35mm

€20.00 E

Shorthand Bird Names

Erica Van Horn and John Bevis

2016

This exercise in Pitman shorthand was found in a 1915 issue of The Reporters’ Journal & Shorthand Magazine. The title, Bird Names, oddly positioned centre-page, is entirely unexpected in the context of a method of rapid writing associated with journalism, commerce and forensics. Shorthand, an essentially post-alphabetic notation, seems here to return to a pictographic condition, like the relic of a tablet or scroll recording an early civilization’s naming of the birds, through some translation of their shape, sound, movement, colouration or behaviour that we can only guess at. Could birds ever have arrived with such superabundance that the writer must resort to the swiftest of marks to record their identities? Or could it be that this is no accident: that the Journal’s editor, Harold V. Clayton, had hit upon the perfect realm for showcasing shorthand’s allusiveness, secrecy and charm? : John Bevis. postcard. 155 x 115 mm

€1.00 E